11/20/2009

Roof Cleaning Sarasota Florida 34230 – 34243

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Here are some sarasota florida tile and shingle roof cleaning we did this past week.
The tile roof cleaning in particular came out wonderful.
The sarasota couple in the picture were delighted with our tile roof cleaning  service.
View Roof Cleaning Sarasota Florida 34230 - 34243
800 290 1377
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Apple Roof Cleaning Sarasota Florida 34230 - 34243

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11/09/2009

Roof Mold Tampa Florida

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Roof Mold Tampa Florida
Here is a Mold Article to read.
It is important to know that Mold spreads easily here in Tampa.
The humid climate in Tampa is Mold friendly.
Your Roof Mold can easily spread to other parts of your Tampa area home.
Let us safely clean your roof mold.
Call (813) 655 8777 for a free roof mold cleaning estimate.
Enjoy the Mold Article!


The issue of mold in Tampa homes has been getting a lot of attention lately – with good reason. Tampa area Homeowners face costly repairs when property is damaged by mold growth, and, in some cases, Florida families experience serious health problems related to mold. As the problems mount, insurance companies are confronting rising claims costs and, sometimes, disagreements over who is responsible when mold attacks.
First, the bad news: As a general rule, roof mold is not covered by homeowners insurance policies. Standard homeowners policies cover disasters and accidents, but aren’t designed to cover roof cleaning and maintenance, which is the category roof mold falls into according to insurers. An exception: In cases where mold results from some accident or disaster (such as bursting pipes), repairs and eradication may be covered.
In addition, roof mold can cause serious health problems for people who suffer from asthma or have allergies (an estimated one in five of us), and can worsen cold symptoms like throat pain and congestion for everyone.
Now, some good news: Mold is everywhere in Tampa, and most of the time is not much of a problem. Mold can grow on roofs, wood, carpet, paper, cloth, leather, sheet rock, insulation, and of course, on foods. Outdoors, it grows in the ground and in shady, damp spots. Indoors, it grows in high humidity and moisture areas including basements, kitchens, and bathrooms as well as ceilings and walls where water collects from leaks. Most molds aren’t particularly dangerous to you, but some do produce hay fever-like allergic symptoms.
The best defense against mold-related catastrophes is to avoid them completely. And it’s not as hard as you might think.
Mold can be eradicated pretty well by cleaning affected areas with bleach and water. But it can grow back. The only way to guard against this is to get rid of moisture completely – whether by cleaning or by replacing damaged floors, boards, walls, and other contaminated areas. While this is certainly not going to be cheap, the cost of letting mold spread and proliferate is going to be much higher in the long run.
So, what should you look for? Signs such as musty smells, or water stains on walls or ceilings can signal the presence of mold. To discourage mold growth:
Keep your home and belongings clean and dry
Fix plumbing leaks immediately
Keep roof and gutters clean of leaves and other debris
Maintain your roof to prevent water from seeping into your home
Keep humidity in your home at 30%-60% with air conditioners or with dehumidifiers, which are good for those with asthma or severe allergies Use exhaust fans in kitchens when cooking
Don’t carpet basements, bathrooms, or damp areas
Vent bathrooms, dryers, and other sources of moisture
Prevent condensation on cold surfaces by insulating windows, piping, outside walls, roof, and floors
Protect from the outside:
Keep your home's exterior painted – ideally with paint containing mold inhibitors
Keep plantbeds away from exterior walls so soil doesn't touch siding
Don't let sprinklers hit walls for an extended time
Don't pile wood or debris against the side of the house
Have your home inspected if you see mold
Make repairs after a flood or other damage
Dry or replace water-damaged carpets, padding and upholstery within two days of their getting soaked.
Remove puddles of water as soon as possible, since it breeds microorganisms.
Wash and disinfect affected areas. This includes walls, floors, closets, shelves, as well as heating and air-conditioning systems.






APPLE ROOF CLEANING TAMPA FLORIDA
7401 Patrician Place
Tampa FL 33619
(813)655 8777
(813)293 1733
(800)290 1377
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11/08/2009

Pressure Cleaner Injured In Chemical Explosion

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Victim Suffers Burns To Chest, Laceration To Cheek

POSTED: 11:29 am EST November 4, 2009
UPDATED: 2:12 pm EST November 4, 2009

ROYAL PALM BEACH, Fla. -- A pressure cleaner was injured after some chemicals he was mixing exploded.
The incident occurred at about 11 a.m. outside 128 Derby Lane.



Fire-rescue crews inspect the chemicals that were used at the time of the explosion.
Palm Beach County Fire-Rescue District Chief Robin Herring said the owner of Kevin's Pressure Cleaning was mixing chemicals in a 5-gallon bucket when he was injured. Herring said it was possible the man was smoking at the time.
"We don't know whether the chemicals mixed caused the reaction or the actual fumes from the chemical, plus the smoking," Herring said.
The man suffered chemical burns to his chest and a laceration to his cheek. He was taken to Palms West Hospital. Read More »

Algae Resistant Roofing Shingles

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Algae Resistant Roofing Shingles

This is a US Patent For making Algae Resistant Roofing Shingles.

We clean these types of shingles here in the Tampa, Florida  almost weekly!
Do they work ?
The answer is Yes, somewhat.
They DO stay free from Algae Infestation longer them regular shingles.
But, the heat and humidity here in Florida soon overwhelms the built in algae protection, and they need cleaning too.
Many of these algae resistant shingles are guaranteed not to get dirty, or require cleaning.
If you have these shingles, and your roof needs cleaning, check your warranty ?
Many times the roof cleaning can be billed to the shingle manufacturer, under a warranty claim.
Contact Apple Roof Cleaning Tampa at 813 655 8777 for more information on how to do this ?

Here is the US Patent :

US Patent 7595107 - Algae resistant roofing system containing silver compounds, algae resistant shingles, and process for producing same




US Patent Issued on September 29, 2009


1. Field of the Invention



The present invention relates to asphalt roofing shingles, protective granules for such shingles, and processes for makings such granules and shingles.



2. Brief Description of the Prior Art



Pigment-coated mineral rocks are commonly used as color granules in roofing applications to provide aesthetic as well as protective functions to the asphalt shingles. Dark blotches or streaks sometimes appear on the surfaces of asphalt shingles,especially in warmer humid climates, because of the growth of algae and other microorganisms. The predominant species responsible is Gloeocapsa magma, a blue-green algae. Eventually, severe discoloration of the entire roof can occur.



Various methods have been used in an attempt to remedy the roofing discoloration. For example, topical treatments with organic algaecides have been used. However, such topical treatments are usually effective only for short term, typically oneto two years. Another approach is to add algaecidal metal oxides to the color granule coatings. This approach is likely to provide longer protection, for example, as long as ten years.



Companies, including Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing (3M) and GAF Materials Corporation/ISP Mineral Products Inc., have commercialized several algaecide granules that are effective in inhibiting algae growth.



A common method used to prepare algae-resistant (AR) roofing granules generally involves two major steps. In the first step, metal oxides such as cuprous oxide and/or zinc oxide are added to a clay and alkali metal silicate mixture. The mixturein turn is used to coat crushed mineral rocks. The mixture is rendered insoluble on the rock surfaces by firing at high temperatures, such as about 500° C., to provide a ceramic coating. In the second step, the oxides covered rocks are coatedwith various color pigments to form colored algae-resistant roofing granules. The algae-resistant granules, alone, or in a mixture with conventional granules, are then used in the manufacture of asphalt shingles using conventional techniques. Thepresence of the algae-resistant granules confers algae-resistance on the shingles.



Roofing granules typically comprise crushed and screened mineral materials, which are subsequently coated with a binder containing one or more coloring pigments, such as suitable metal oxides. The binder can be a soluble alkaline silicate thatis subsequently insolubilized by heat or by chemical reaction, such as by reaction between an acidic material and the alkaline silicate, resulting in an insoluble colored coating on the mineral particles.



U.S. Pat. No. 3,507,676 discloses roofing granules containing zinc, zinc oxide, or zinc sulfide, as an algaecide and fungicide.





Algae resistant shingles are disclosed, for example, in U.S. Pat. No. 5,356,664 assigned to Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Co., which discloses the use of a blend of algae-resistant granules and non-algae-resistant granules. Thealgae-resistant granules have an inner ceramic coating comprising cuprous oxide and an outer seal coating initially devoid of copper.



There is a continuing need for algae-resistant roofing products having algaecide leaching rates that can be controlled so that the roofing products can be tailored for specific local conditions.



SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION



The present invention provides algae-resistant roofing granules, algae-resistant sheet roofing products such as asphalt shingles and roofing membranes, and processes for make such products. Algae-resistance is provided by metallic silver orsilver compounds having a high surface area.



In one presently preferred embodiment of the present invention, the algae-resistant sheet roofing products include algae-resistant roofing granules. These roofing granules are formed from base particles comprising an inert mineral which arecoated with an exterior coating layer. The exterior coating includes biocidal particles which are selected from (1) biocidal particles having an average size from about 0.1 micrometers to about 5 millimeters and having a surface coating comprising atleast one silver biocide; and (2) microcapsules having an average size from about 200 micrometers and 5 millimeters. The microcapsules preferably have capsule walls that are environmentally degradable in a controlled manner, and cores including aplurality of biocidal particles. The biocidal particles preferably have an average size from about 0.1 micrometers to about 0.5 millimeters, and a surface coating comprising at least one silver biocide. The at least one silver biocide is preferablyselected from the group consisting of metallic silver and silver compounds.



Preferably, the biocidal particles include a core selected from the group consisting of solid cores and hollow cores. In one embodiment, the solid core is formed from at least one core material selected from the group consisting of metals andmetal oxides. In another embodiment, the hollow core is enclosed by a wall formed from glass or a ceramic material.



In one embodiment of the present invention, the exterior coating layer of the algae-resistant granules includes a silicaceous coating binder, and optionally, colorants such as metal oxide colorants, and the like. The coating layer can alsooptionally include latent reactants such as kaolin clay or multi-valent metal ions. In another embodiment of the present invention, the exterior coating layer includes an organic polymeric material as a coating binder.



Preferably, the silver biocide comprises from about 0.005 percent to about 5 percent by weight of the algae-resistant granules, more preferably from about 0.01 percent to about 5 percent by weight of the algae-resistant granules, and still morepreferably from about 0.02 percent to about 2 percent by weight of the algae-resistant granules.



Preferably, the silver biocide employed in the algae-resistant roofing granules of the present invention has a surface area of at least 0.5 square meter per gram of biocide, more preferably at least 2 square meter per gram of biocide, and stillmore preferably at least 5 square meter per gram of biocide.



The present invention also provides a sheet-roofing product, such as asphalt roof shingles or roofing membranes. In one embodiment, a sheet-roofing product according to the present invention includes a bituminous base and algae-resistant roofinggranules according to the present invention.



In another embodiment, a sheet-roofing product according to the present invention includes a bituminous base including an upper layer formed from an asphaltic material, and biocidal particles embedded in the upper layer. The embedded biocidalparticles are selected from (1) biocidal particles having an average size from about 0.1 micrometers to about 5 millimeters and having a surface coating comprising at least one silver biocide; and (2) microcapsules having an average size from about 200micrometers and 5 millimeters. Preferably, the microcapsules preferably have capsule walls that are environmentally degradable in a controlled manner, and cores including a plurality of biocidal particles. The biocidal particles preferably have anaverage size from about 0.1 micrometers to about 0.5 millimeters, and a surface coating comprising at least one silver biocide. The at least one silver biocide is preferably selected from the group consisting of metallic silver and silver compounds. Preferably, the biocidal particles include a core selected from the group consisting of solid cores and hollow cores. In one embodiment, the solid core is formed from at least one core material selected from the group consisting of metals and metaloxides. In another embodiment, the hollow core is enclosed by a wall formed from an inorganic or organic glass, a semi crystalline material, a ceramic material, or a ceramer material.



In this embodiment, the biocidal particles are preferably embedded in the upper layer at a loading of from about 1 to about 200, preferably from about 5 to about 50, milligrams of biocidal particles per square centimeter of the surface of theupper layer. In this embodiment, the biocidal particles preferably have a surface area of at least about 10 square meter per square meter of the surface of the upper layer. Preferably, the biocidal particles are embedded in the upper layer such that atleast sixty percent of the biocidal particles are exposed on the top surface of the upper layer. More preferably, the biocidal particles have an exposed surface area of at least about 10 square meter per square meter of the surface of the upper layer.



In yet another embodiment, a sheet-roofing product according to the present invention includes a bituminous base including an upper layer formed from an asphaltic material, and a surface coating applied to the upper layer. The surface coatingincludes biocidal particles which are selected from (1) biocidal particles having an average size from about 0.1 micrometers to about 5 millimeters and having a surface coating comprising at least one silver biocide; and (2) microcapsules having anaverage size from about 200 micrometers and 5 millimeters. Preferably, the microcapsules preferably have capsule walls that are environmentally degradable in a controlled manner, and cores including a plurality of biocidal particles. The biocidalparticles preferably have an average size from about 0.1 micrometers to about 0.5 millimeters, and a surface coating comprising at least one silver biocide. The at least one silver biocide is preferably selected from the group consisting of metallicsilver and silver compounds. Preferably, the biocidal particles include a core selected from the group consisting of solid cores and hollow cores. In one embodiment, the solid core is formed from at least one core material selected from the groupconsisting of metals and metal oxides. In another embodiment, the hollow core is enclosed by a wall formed from an organic or inorganic glass, a semi crystalline material, a ceramic material, or a ceramer material.



In this embodiment, the biocidal particles are preferably embedded in the surface coating at a loading of from about 0.1 to about 200, preferably from about 15 to 10, more preferably from about 3 to about 50 milligrams of biocidal particles persquare centimeter of the exposed surface of the surface coating. In this embodiment, the biocidal particles preferably have a surface area of at least 10 square cm per square centimeter of the exposed surface of the surface coating. In one embodiment,the surface coating includes a binder subject to controlled environmental degradation. In another embodiment, the surface coating is preferably formed from a material resistant to environmental degradation. The surface coating can include a polymericbinder, such as a polymeric binder formed from a poly(meth)acrylate, polyurethane or polyurea. The surface coating can also include material to impart solar heat reflectance, including a reflective pigment such as titanium dioxide. In one presentlypreferred embodiment, the surface coating includes a transparent binder, such as a suitable poly(meth)acrylate, and biocidal particles are selected to minimize the opacity or turbidity of the surface coating, such as by selecting biocidal particlessmaller than about 400 nm.



The present invention also provides a process for preparing algae-resistant granules. In the present process, base particles comprising inert material are provided, and coated with an exterior coating composition. The exterior coatingcomposition comprises biocidal particles selected from the group consisting of (1) biocidal particles having an average size from about 0.1 micrometers to about 5 millimeters and having a surface coating comprising at least one silver biocide selectedfrom the group consisting of metallic silver and silver compounds; and (2) microcapsules having an average size from about 200 micrometers and 5 millimeters. The capsule wall is preferably environmentally degradable in a controlled manner, and thecapsule core includes a plurality of biocidal particles having an average size from about 0.1 micrometers to about 0.5 millimeters and having a surface coating comprising at least one silver biocide selected from the group consisting of metallic silverand silver compounds. The exterior coating composition is then cured. Preferably, the exterior coating composition is cured at temperature low enough to avoid oxidizing the silver or silver compound(s). Preferably, the exterior coating composition iscured at a temperature less than about 300 degrees Celsius. In the alternative, or in addition, the exterior coating composition is cured in a non-oxidizing atmosphere, in order to avoid, reduce, or minimize the potential extent of oxidation of thesilver or silver compound(s).



The algae-resistant granules prepared according to the process of the present invention can be employed in the manufacture of algae-resistant roofing products, such as algae-resistant asphalt shingles or roofing membranes. The algae-resistantgranules of the present invention can be mixed with conventional roofing granules, and the granule mixture can be embedded in the surface of bituminous or other roofing products using conventional methods. Alternatively, the algae-resistant granules ofthe present invention can be substituted for conventional roofing granules in manufacture of bituminous roofing products, such as asphalt roofing shingles or roofing membranes, to provide those roofing products with algae-resistance.



It is an object of the present invention to provide a process for preparing roofing shingles to have algae-resistance that can be customized to the specific geographic region in which the shingles are intended to be used.



It is a further object of the present invention to provide algae-resistant roofing granules having controllable levels of algaecide release.



It is a further object of the present invention to provide algae-resistant asphalt shingles.



These and other objects of the invention will become apparent through the following description and claims.



BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES



FIG. 1 is a schematic representation of a first type of an algae-resistant granule of the present invention.



FIG. 2 is a fragmentary, expanded schematic representation of the algae-resistant granule of FIG. 1.



FIG. 3 is a schematic representation of a second type of an algae-resistant granule of the present invention.



FIG. 4 is a fragmentary, expanded schematic representation of the algae-resistant granule of FIG. 3.



FIG. 5 is a fragmentary schematic representation of a first type of algae-resistant roofing product according to the present invention.



FIG. 6 is a fragmentary schematic representation of a second type of algae-resistant roofing product according to the present invention.



FIG. 7 is a fragmentary schematic representation of a third type of algae-resistant roofing product according to the present invention.



DETAILED DESCRIPTION



The algae-resistant roofing granules of the present invention can be prepared through traditional granule preparation methods, such as those disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 2,981,636, incorporated herein by reference.



The base particles employed in the process of preparing the algae-resistant granules of the present invention are preferably chemically inert materials, such as inert mineral particles. The mineral particles, which can be produced by a series ofquarrying, crushing, and screening operations, are generally intermediate between sand and gravel in size (that is, between about 8 US mesh and 70 US mesh), and preferably have an average particle size of from about 0.2 mm to about 3 mm, and morepreferably from about 0.4 mm to about 2.4 mm.



In particular, suitably sized particles of naturally occurring materials such as talc, slag, granite, silica sand, greenstone, andesite, porphyry, marble, syenite, rhyolite, diabase, greystone, quartz, slate, trap rock, basalt, and marine shellscan be used, as well as recycled manufactured materials such as crushed bricks, concrete, porcelain, fire clay, and the like.



In preparing algae-resistant roofing granules according to the present invention, an exterior coating layer is applied to the base particles. The exterior coating layer includes biocidal particles, and preferably includes a suitable coatingbinder. The coating binder can be an inorganic or organic material, and is preferably formed from a polymeric organic material or a silicaceous material, such as a metal-silicate binder, for example an alkali metal silicate, such as sodium silicate.



When a metal-silicate binder is employed in the preparation of algae-resistant granules of the present invention, the binder preferably includes a heat-reactive aluminosilicate material, such as clay, preferably, kaolin. Alternatively, the metalsilicate binder can be insolubilized chemically by reaction with an acidic material, for example, ammonium chloride, aluminum chloride, hydrochloric acid, calcium chloride, aluminum sulfate, and magnesium chloride, such as disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 2,591,149, 2,614,051, 2,898,232 and 2,981,636, each incorporated herein by reference, or other acidic material such as aluminum fluoride. In another alternative, the binder can be a controlled release sparingly water soluble glass such as a phosphorouspentoxide glass modified with calcium fluoride, such as disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 6,143,318, incorporated herein by reference.



Suitable inert base particles, for example, mineral particles with size passing #8 mesh and retaining on #70 mesh, can be coated with a combination of a metal-silicate binder, kaolin clay, color pigments such as metal oxide pigments to reachdesirable colors, and biocidal particles, followed by a heat treatment to obtain a durable coating.



When the coated granules are fired at an elevated temperature, such as at conditions of at least about 800 degrees F., and preferably at temperatures from about 1,000 to about 1,200 degrees F., the clay binder densifies to form strong particles. Preferably, the temperature employed is low enough to avoid oxidation of silver and or silver compounds employed in the biocidal particles.



Examples of clays that can be employed in the process of the present invention include kaolin, other aluminosilicate clays, Dover clay, bentonite clay, etc.



In the alternative, a suitable silicaceous binder can be formed from sodium silicate, modified by the addition of at least one of sodium fluorosilicate, aluminum fluoride, or Portland cement.



The algae-resistant roofing granules of the present invention can be colored using conventional coatings pigments. Examples of coating pigments that can be used include those provided by the Color Division of Ferro Corporation, 4150 East 56thSt., Cleveland, Ohio 44101, and produced using high temperature calcinations, including PC-9415 Yellow, PC-9416 Yellow, PC-9158 Autumn Gold, PC-9189 Bright Golden Yellow, V-9186 Iron-Free Chestnut Brown, V-780 Black, V0797 IR Black, V-9248 Blue, PC-9250Bright Blue, PC-5686 Turquoise, V-13810 Red, V-12600 Camouflage Green, V12560 IR Green, V-778 IR Black, and V-799 Black.



In the alternative, the exterior coating layer can include an organic polymeric material as a coating binder. Suitable organic polymeric materials include poly(meth)acrylates, polyurethanes and polyureas. Such polymeric binders can besubstantially amorphous or can be semi-crystalline in nature.



The biocidal particles employed in compositions, articles and processes of the present invention are preferably selected from the group consisting of (1) biocidal particles having an average size from about 0.1 micrometers to about 5 millimetersand having a surface coating comprising at least one silver biocide selected from the group consisting of metallic silver and silver compounds; and (2) microcapsules having an average size from about 200 micrometers and 5 millimeters, and having acapsule wall environmentally degradable in a controlled manner and a core comprising a plurality of biocidal particles having an average size from about 0.1 micrometers to about 0.5 millimeters and having a surface coating comprising at least one silverbiocide selected from the group consisting of metallic silver and silver compounds.



The preparation of biocidal particles for use in the present invention is disclosed, for example, in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,180,585, 5,503,840, and 5,595,750, each of which is incorporated herein by reference. Biocidal particles for use in thepresent invention are available from AirQual Corporation, 35 Industrial Drive, Canton, Mass. 02021 under the brand name ACT.



The biocidal particles include either a solid core or a hollow core. Examples of solid core materials include fine particles of titanium oxide, aluminum oxide, zinc oxide, cupric oxide, cuprous oxide, calcium sulfate, strontium sulfate, bariumsulfate, zeolites, mica, talc, kaolin and silica. When a solid core is employed, the solid core is preferably formed from at least one core material selected from the group consisting of metals and metal oxides. Titanium oxide is especially preferredas a core material. Either anatase or rutile titanium oxide can be used as a material for forming solid cores. Suitable particles with hollow cores can be provided, for example, by microspheres having glass walls enclosing a hollow interior, such asdisclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 2,978,340, 3,030,215, 3,129,086 3,230,064, 3,365,315, 4,279,632, 4,391,646 and 4,767,726, or ceramic walls enclosing a hollow interior, such as disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 2,978,340, 3,792,136, 4,111,713, 4,744,831, and5,077,241.



Preferably, the core material is insoluble in water. The core material can have a regular shape, such as, for example, a spherical, ellipsoidal, cubic, rhombohedral, platelet or acicular shape, or an irregular shape. The average particle sizeof the core material can range from about 0.01 micrometers to about 100 micrometers, preferably from about 0.1 micrometer to about 5 micrometers. Preferably, the core material has a specific surface area of from about 0.1 square meters per gram to about100 square meters per gram of core material.



The silver biocide is preferably selected from metallic silver and silver compounds, such as silver oxide, silver chloride, silver bromide, silver iodide. Mixtures of silver and/or silver compounds with one or more other biocidal materials, suchas, for example, copper, cuprous oxide, cupric acetate, cupric chloride, cupric nitrate, cupric oxide, cupric sulfate, cupric sulfide, cupric stearate, cupric cyanide, cuprous cyanide, cuprous stannate, cuprous thiocyanate, cupric silicate, cuprouschloride, cupric iodide, cupric bromide, cupric carbonate, cupric fluoroborate, zinc oxide, such as French process zinc oxide, zinc sulfide, zinc borate, zinc sulfate, zinc pyrithione, zinc ricinoleate, zinc stearate, zinc chromate, zinc carbonate, andmixtures thereof. Silver alloys, such as alloys of silver and copper, and alloys of silver and zinc, can also be employed.



The silver biocide preferably comprises from about 0.05 percent to 40 percent, more preferably form about 0.1 percent to about 15 percent by weight of the core material.



The silver biocide is deposited as a coating layer on the core material, such as, for example, by precipitation, and is in turn preferably coated with a protective coating such as silica or alumina or an aluminosilicate, preferably such that theprotective coating comprises from about 0.5 percent to about 20 percent, more preferably from about 1 to about 5 percent by weight of the biocidal particles. Preferably, the protective coating is sufficiently porous to permit diffusion of the silverbiocide through the protective coating. In order to increase the dispersability of the biocidal particles, the isoelectric point of the particles can be adjusted, such as by the addition of one or more supplemental exterior coating layers, to provide anisoelectric point between about 5.5 and 9.5. The supplemental exterior coating layer can be provided by a coating of a hydrous metal oxide such as alumina, magnesia, or zirconia. The resulting biocidal particles are preferably dried and, if necessary,processed to provide a fine powder, such as by milling. A dispersing agent such as an organic ester, a polyol, or polyester oligomer can be employed to aid in providing a finely divided powder of biocidal particles.



In one presently preferred embodiment, the biocidal particles are preferably mixed directly with the binder of the exterior coating composition, along with suitable colorants, pigments, et al., and the exterior coating composition can then beapplied to the base particles by a conventional technique. In another presently preferred embodiment, the biocidal particles are first encapsulated in microcapsules, and the microcapsules are in turn dispersed in the exterior coating composition. Ineither case, the coating composition is then cured to provide the algae-resistant roofing granules of the present invention. The composition of the exterior coating of the algae-resistant roofing granules and the curing method are preferably selected tominimize oxidation of the silver biocide, when a non-oxide biocide such as metallic silver is employed as the silver biocide.



The finely divided powder of biocidal particles can be encapsulated in microcapsules using conventional techniques for forming microcapsules, including such techniques as interfacial polymerization, phase separation/coacervation, spray drying,spray coating, fluid bed coating, supercritical anti-solvent precipitation, and the like. Techniques for microencapsulating solid biocidal particles and other solid particles are disclosed, for example, in G. Beestman, "Microencapsulation of SolidParticles," Controlled-Release Delivery Systems for Pesticides, (H. B. Scher, Ed., Marcel Dekker, Inc. New York 1999) pp. 31-54, Kirk-Othmer Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology, 4th Edition; as well in U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,156,245, 6,797,277, and6,861,145. Preferably, the microcapsules formed have an average size of from about 200 micrometers to about 5 millimeters, and more preferably of from about 400 micrometers to about 2 mm. Preferably, the microcapsules are formed from a material thatprovides capsule walls that are environmentally degradable in a controlled manner. Such controlled release microcapsules are well known in the pharmaceutical and agrochemical arts. A variety of mechanisms can be employed to provide such capsules. Forexample, the capsule wall can include additive to increase their sensitivity to environmental degradation, such as disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 6,936,644 (IR sensitivity). Preferably, the microcapsules are formulated to provide controlled release of thebiocidal particles from the microcapsules over an extended period. A mixture of microcapsules having differing time-release characteristics can be employed, so that there is a continuous release of biocide over an extended period of time, such as, forexample, over the anticipated life of the roofing product.



The proportion of biocidal particles in the algae-resistant roofing granules can be adjusted depending on a number of factors, such as the intended use of the roofing products manufactured using the algae-resistant granules, the expectedenvironmental conditions at the site where the roofing products including the algae-resistant granules are to be installed, the proportion of silver biocide in the biocidal particles, the porosity of the protective layer of the biocidal particles, theporosity of the exterior coating composition of the roofing granules, the proportion of algae-resistant roofing granules to conventional non-algae-resistant roofing granules employed in the roofing product, et al. In general, however, the proportion ofbiocidal particles mixed in the exterior coating composition is preferably selected to provide algae-resistant roofing granules in which the biocidal particles comprise from about 0.005 to about 5 percent by weight of the granules. Preferably, theproportion of biocidal particles in the exterior coating composition is selected to provide algae-resistant roofing granules in which the biocidal particles have a surface area of from about 0.05 to about 3, preferably from about 0.1 to about 2, morepreferably from about 0.5 to about 1 square meter per gram of algae-resistant roofing granules.



The algae resistance properties of the algae-resistant roofing granules of the present invention are determined by a number of factors, including the porosity of the surface coating of the roofing granules, the nature and amount(s) of the biocideemployed, and the spatial distribution of the algaecide in the coating of the granules.



The process of the present invention advantageously permits the algae resistance of the shingles employing the algae-resistant granules to be tailored to specific local conditions. For example, in geographic areas encumbered with excessivemoisture favoring rapid algae growth, the granules can be structured to release the relatively high levels of algaecide required to effectively inhibit algae growth under these conditions. Conversely, where algae growth is less favored by localconditions, the granules can be structured to release the lower levels of algaecide effective under these conditions.



In another embodiment of the present invention, silver-containing biocidal particles such as describe above are embedded in the upper layer of a roofing product including a bituminous base. In this embodiment, a sheet roofing product, such asasphalt roofing shingles or asphaltic roll roofing stock, including a bituminous base including an upper layer formed from an asphaltic material. The upper layer typically covers a lower layer in which a fibrous web is embedded, such as a web of glassreinforcing fibers. In this embodiment, biocidal particles are embedded in the upper layer. The biocidal particles can be embedded by using a conventional process. For example, the biocidal particles can be dusted on top of the upper layer shortlyafter application of the asphaltic material to a glass fiber web, while the asphaltic material is still in a fluid or semi-solid state, so that the biocidal particles adhere to the asphaltic material of the upper layer and become embedded therein whenthe upper layer has cooled sufficiently. The biocidal particles can be applied before roofing granules, such as conventional coloring granules, or a mixture of coloring granules and algae-resistant granules, are applied to the upper layer in order toadhere the roofing granules.



In yet another embodiment of the present invention, silver-containing biocidal particles such as described above are dispersed in a fluid coating composition, and the coating composition is applied to the intended exterior surface of a roofingproduct such as asphaltic roofing shingles, asphaltic roll roofing stock, or the like. The coating composition is then cured to provide a coating including the silver-containing biocidal particles over the upper surface of the roofing product. In thiscase, the coating composition can be applied either before or after roofing granules have been applied to the surface. Preferably, the coating composition is applied after the roofing granules have been applied. The coating composition also preferablyincludes a uv-resistant film-forming binder such as a poly(methacrylate) with a suitable glass transition temperature, as well as, optionally, suitable coalescents, solvents, plasticizers, pigments, colorants, and the like.



In another aspect of the present invention, a fluid coating composition containing biocidal particles such as described above is applied to the upper layer of a roofing product including a bituminous base, such as asphalt roofing shingle stock,before the addition of roofing granules to the roofing product.



Referring now to the drawings, in which like reference numeral refer to like elements in each of the several views, there is shown in FIGS. 1, 2, 3 and 4 schematically examples of algae-resistant granules prepared according to the process of thepresent invention.



FIG. 1 is a schematic representation of a first type of an algae-resistant granule of the present invention. FIG. 1 schematically illustrates an algae-resistant granule 10 formed from an inert mineral base particle 20 covered with an exteriorcoating layer 30 in which are distributed biocidal particles 40.



FIG. 2 is a fragmentary, expanded schematic representation of the algae-resistant granule 10 of FIG. 1. The exterior coating layer 30 on the base particle 20 includes an exterior coating composition 32 in which the biocidal particles 40 aredispersed. The biocidal particles 40 include a particle core 42 covered with a particle surface coating layer 44 formed from a surface coating composition 46 containing silver biocide 48, such as metallic silver, dispersed in a surface coatingcomposition 46.



FIG. 3 is a schematic representation of a second type of an algae-resistant granule 110 of the present invention. FIG. 3 schematically illustrates an algae-resistant granule 110 formed from an inert mineral base particle 120 covered with anexterior coating layer 130 in which are distributed microcapsules 150 including biocidal particles.



FIG. 4 is a fragmentary, expanded schematic representation of the algae-resistant granule 110 of FIG. 3. The exterior coating layer 130 includes an exterior coating composition 132 in which the microcapsules 150 including a wall 154 enclosing ahollow core 152 in which the biocidal particles 140 are dispersed. The wall 154 of the microcapsules 150 is optionally covered with a suitable surface coating 156. The biocidal particles 140 include a particle core 142 covered with a particle surfacecoating layer 144 containing silver biocide 148, such as silver oxide, dispersed in a surface coating composition 146.



FIG. 5 is a fragmentary schematic representation of a first type of algae-resistant roofing product or shingle 200 according to the present invention. In this algae-resistant roofing product 200 a base 202 including a lower layer 204 comprisinga reinforcing web of glass fibers (not shown) saturated with a bituminous material is covered with a bituminous upper layer 206. A plurality of roofing granules 208 are embedded in the upper layer 206, as well as a plurality of silver-containingbiocidal particles 210.



FIG. 6 is a fragmentary schematic representation of a second type of algae-resistant roofing product 220 according to the present invention. In this algae-resistant roofing product 220 a base 222 including a lower layer 224 comprising areinforcing web of glass fibers (not shown) saturated with a bituminous material is covered with a bituminous upper layer 226. A plurality of roofing granules 228 are embedded in the upper layer 226, as well as a plurality of microcapsules 230containing silver-containing biocidal particles.



FIG. 7 is a fragmentary schematic representation of a third type of algae-resistant roofing product 240 according to the present invention. In this algae-resistant roofing product 240 a base 242 including a lower layer 244 comprising areinforcing web of glass fibers (not shown) saturated with a bituminous material is covered with a bituminous upper layer 246. A plurality of roofing granules 248 are embedded in the upper layer 246. A surface coating 250 including a surface coatingbinder 254 and containing a plurality of silver-containing biocidal particles 252 cover the upper surface of upper layer 246 and the otherwise exposed exterior surfaces of the roofing granules 248.



The present invention also provides a process for the manufacture of algae-resistant roofing granules. In this process base particles comprising inert material are provided, and then the base particles are coated with an exterior coatingcomposition. The exterior coating composition includes biocidal particles. The biocidal particles are selected from the group consisting of (1) biocidal particles having an average size from about 0.1 micrometers to about 5 millimeters and having asurface coating comprising at least one silver biocide selected from the group consisting of metallic silver and silver compounds; and (2) microcapsules having an average size from about 200 micrometers and 5 millimeters, and having a capsule wallenvironmentally degradable in a controlled manner and a core comprising a plurality of biocidal particles having an average size from about 0.5 micrometers to about 0.5 millimeters and having a surface coating comprising at least one silver biocideselected from the group consisting of metallic silver and silver compounds. Next, the exterior coating composition is cured.



The exterior coating composition can include a silicaceous binder such as silica. The exterior coating composition is preferably cured under conditions such that the biocidal effectiveness of the silver biocide is not significantly degraded. Thus, for example, when the silver biocide is metallic silver, elevated temperatures and/or oxidizing conditions that would tend to oxide the metallic silver are to be avoided. Thus, for example, when silica is employed as the binder for the exteriorcoating composition, chemical curing agents, such as acidic materials, for example, aluminum fluoride, or reduced cure temperatures, or a combination of reduced cure temperature and a suitable chemical curing agent, can be employed. Preferably, theexterior coating composition is cured at temperature less than about 300 degrees Celsius. Thus, preferably, the exterior coating composition is cured in an inert or a non-oxidizing atmosphere, such as a nitrogen atmosphere.



The exterior coating composition used in preparing the algae-resistant granules can include other components, such as conventional metal oxide colorants of the type employed in the manufacture of roofing granules, solar heat-reflective pigmentssuch as titanium dioxide, other biocidal materials, and the like.



The algae-resistant granules prepared according to the process of the present invention can be employed in the manufacture of algae-resistant roofing products, such as algae-resistant asphalt shingles, using conventional roofing productionprocesses. Typically, bituminous roofing products are sheet goods that include a non-woven base or scrim formed of a fibrous material, such as a glass fiber scrim. The base is coated with one or more layers of a bituminous material such as asphalt toprovide water and weather resistance to the roofing product. One side of the roofing product is typically coated with mineral granules to provide durability, reflect heat and solar radiation, and to protect the bituminous binder from environmentaldegradation. The algae-resistant granules of the present invention can be mixed with conventional roofing granules, and the granule mixture can be embedded in the surface of such bituminous roofing products using conventional methods. Alternatively,the algae-resistant granules of the present invention can be substituted for conventional roofing granules in the manufacture of bituminous roofing products to provide those roofing products with algae-resistance.



Bituminous roofing products are typically manufactured in continuous processes in which a continuous substrate sheet of a fibrous material such as a continuous felt sheet or glass fiber mat is immersed in a bath of hot, fluid bituminous coatingmaterial so that the bituminous material saturates the substrate sheet and coats at least one side of the substrate. The reverse side of the substrate sheet can be coated with an anti-stick material such as a suitable mineral powder or a fine sand. Roofing granules are then distributed over selected portions of the top of the sheet, and the bituminous material serves as an adhesive to bind the roofing granules to the sheet when the bituminous material has cooled. The sheet can then be cut intoconventional shingle sizes and shapes (such as one foot by three feet rectangles), slots can be cut in the shingles to provide a plurality of "tabs" for ease of installation, additional bituminous adhesive can be applied in strategic locations andcovered with release paper to provide for securing successive courses of shingles during roof installation, and the finished shingles can be packaged. More complex methods of shingle construction can also be employed, such as building up multiple layersof sheet in selected portions of the shingle to provide an enhanced visual appearance, or to simulate other types of roofing products.



The bituminous material used in manufacturing roofing products according to the present invention is derived from a petroleum processing by-product such as pitch, "straight-run" bitumen, or "blown" bitumen. The bituminous material can bemodified with extender materials such as oils, petroleum extracts, and/or petroleum residues. The bituminous material can include various modifying ingredients such as polymeric materials, such as SBS (styrene-butadiene-styrene) block copolymers,resins, oils, flame-retardant materials, oils, stabilizing materials, anti-static compounds, and the like. Preferably, the total amount by weight of such modifying ingredients is not more than about 15 percent of the total weight of the bituminousmaterial. The bituminous material can also include amorphous polyolefins, up to about 25 percent by weight. Examples of suitable amorphous polyolefins include atactic polypropylene, ethylene-propylene rubber, etc. Preferably, the amorphous polyolefinsemployed have a softening point of from about 130 degrees C. to about 160 degrees C. The bituminous composition can also include a suitable filler, such as calcium carbonate, talc, carbon black, stone dust, or fly ash, preferably in an amount from about10 percent to 70 percent by weight of the bituminous composite material.



The following example is provided to better disclose and teach processes and compositions of the present invention. The example is for illustrative purposes only, and it must be acknowledged that minor variations and changes can be made withoutmaterially affecting the spirit and scope of the invention as recited in the claims that follow.



EXAMPLE 1



Roofing granules with a surface coating containing a silver compound were produced by mixing together the following ingredients together in a paddle mixer for 2-3 minutes: 500 g of crushed and screened rhyolite igneous rock from Piedmont, Mo. having an average particle size of 1 mm, 19 g of aqueous sodium silicate (40% solids, with Na20:Si02 ratio of 1:3.2), 1.4 g of aluminum fluoride, 0.4 g of sodium fluorosilicate, 0.4 g of Portland cement, and 2.3 g of silver compound AQ 200(silver coated zinc oxide particles depicted in FIG. 1, average particle size 1 micrometers, from AirQual Corporation, Canton, Mass.). The granules were fired at 230° C. for 20 minutes to form algae resistant roofing granules with silver on thesurface layer.



Various modifications can be made in the details of the various embodiments of the processes, compositions and articles of the present invention, all within the scope and spirit of the invention and defined by the appended claims.

APPLE ROOF CLEANING TAMPA FLORIDA
7401 Patrician Place
Tampa FL 33619
(813)655 8777
(813)293 1733
(800)290 1377 Read More »

11/06/2009

Roof Cleaning Lakewood Ranch FL 34202

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Roof Cleaning Lakewood Ranch 34202

Lakewood Ranch has a pretty strict homeowners association when it comes to roof cleaning.
This Lakewood Ranch resident got a roof cleaning letter, and called us.
If you need Roof Cleaning in Lakewood Ranch 34202, give us a call at (813) 655 8777.
We offer free estimates for all Non Pressure Roof Cleaning Lakewood Ranch Florida customers.
IMG_0301 IMG_0300 Read More »

11/03/2009

Gutter cleaner falls off roof

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Hire a roof and gutter cleaning professional.
This could happen to you.

Gutter cleaner falls off roof

Posted Mon Nov 2, 2009 8:32pm AEDT

Map: Brisbane 4000
A worker cleaning the roof of the Prime Minister's house in Brisbane has been seriously injured in a fall.

Police say the man was cleaning leaves from the roof just after midday when he slipped and fell several metres to the ground.

He was taken to hospital by ambulance but authorities are not yet revealing the extent of his injuries.

WorkCover Queensland is investigating the accident.

A spokesman for the Prime Minister says Mr Rudd and his family are concerned for the injured worker.

"This morning there was a terrible accident involving a tradesman cleaning the gutters at the Rudd family house in Brisbane," he said.

"Following the accident an ambulance was called and the tradesman involved is now receiving medical treatment in a Brisbane hospital.

"This was a serious accident and as is appropriate both the Queensland Police and WorkCover Queensland were immediately notified."




APPLE ROOF CLEANING TAMPA FLORIDA
7401 Patrician Place
Tampa FL 33619
(813)655 8777
(813)293 1733
(800)290 1377 Read More »

11/02/2009

Deed Restriction Tampa Florida

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APPLE ROOF CLEANING TAMPA FLORIDA
7401 Patrician Place
Tampa FL 33619
(813)655 8777
(813)293 1733
(800)290 1377

Here is a great article on the reality of Deed Restrictions here in Tampa.
I am a Ham Radio Operator, and must have a tower for my Ham Radio Antennas.
No way could I live in a Tampa Deed Restricted Community.

Many of our roof cleaning customers live in these Deed Restricted Subdivisions.
Apple Roof Cleaning Tampa does not raise our prices, just because your folks got a roof cleaning letter.
Call us for a free estimate, we are affordable and most of all, competent.


Article Courtesy of The Tampa Tribune

By Julie Pace
Posted on Sunday, June 18, 2006

TAMPA - It's a standard of success for many Americans - owning your own home.

It's where you can spend weekends painting, watching your children play basketball in the driveway, and walking the dog around the block.

In the Tampa Bay area, homeowners increasingly are being told to get that paint color approved, put the basketball hoop away at night, and walk the dog only in designated areas.

If you don't like the rules, don't move into the neighborhood, say supporters of the deed-restricted communities where these regulations are typical.

But finding a neighborhood without restrictions is becoming harder to do in the Bay area.

Changes in land development codes and growth management regulations mean nearly every single-family home built in Hillsborough, Pasco and Pinellas counties during the past decade has a homeowner association, bringing the number of association-run communities to more than 1,000.

That is part of a nationwide trend that has seen homeowner association communities rise from 6,000 in 1970 to about 157,300 in 2006. The heaviest concentrations are in fast-growing states such as Florida, California and Arizona.

Buying in homeowner association communities might mean gaining control of neighborhood aesthetics, but it also means losing basic rights. Some homeowners aren't aware of that, especially if they don't read the rules. Those rules are often more than 100 pages long and filled with legal jargon.

Not knowing the rules can cost residents thousands of dollars and, in extreme cases, their homes.

Newer Homes, Little Choice

The changing housing market affects the Bay area's middle-income buyers the most. They're the ones most likely to look for homes that cost about $201,700, the median home price in the Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater area.

The median price of a single-family home in Hillsborough County is $212,000. Most houses that hover around that price are in areas saturated with deed-restricted communities, such as Carrollwood and south Brandon.

Neighborhoods with fewer deed-restricted communities tend to fall at both ends of the spectrum - high-end houses in south Tampa, where the average home price is between $325,000 and $425,000, and low-end houses in areas like Sulphur Springs, where the average price is $120,000.

Rolando Genao considers himself an average buyer. The 40-year-old small-business owner and father of three relocated from Danbury, Conn., to Tampa to escape cold winters.

When Genao started house hunting, price was the most important factor. Genao also considered location and the quality of schools.

Whether a community had deed restrictions and a homeowner association was not something he considered. He didn't have to. Most neighborhoods in his price range - about $300,000 - were run by homeowner associations.

Genao expects to close soon on a house in Countryway, a deed-restricted community in northwest Hillsborough County.

He will pay a $340 annual homeowner association fee to maintain community tennis courts, playgrounds and landscaping.

Having never lived in a deed-restricted community, Genao took some time to read the rules. Nothing seems unreasonable, he said, and he likes the idea of living in a well-maintained neighborhood.

Still, Genao is not convinced it takes a homeowner association and deed restrictions to have a nice neighborhood.

"I wish the luxury of having a nice area, and people who take care of it, would be free," he said.

No Rules. Just Right?

That type of community is possible, said Peter Anello, a resident of Four Oaks, an 81-year-old, association-free community tucked between Citrus Park and Carrollwood.

Since purchasing his home in 1985, Anello has watched deed-restricted communities pop up around him, but he said he's proud that his neighborhood has maintained its character.

"We're very individualistic out in the neighborhood," he said. "It's like a little gem."

Because there is no association, there is no protection from a neighbor who fills their yard with lawn kitsch or leaves a rusty car in the driveway.

Anello said he would rather have nearly a half-acre of property and a street lined with nearly century-old grand oaks than a neighborhood where all the houses look the same.

In a deed-restricted community, "You have trouble finding somebody's house because they all look alike," he said.

With fewer communities like Four Oaks available, other homeowners looking to escape restrictions find themselves moving to more rural counties.

That's how Walter Morrissey found himself in a restriction-free neighborhood in Hudson, after getting fed up with Pasco County's Beacon Woods, where he was banned from parking his pickup in his driveway.

Morrissey's new neighbors in Brooksville formed an informal association to help clean up common areas, but there are no rules telling residents what they can or can't do on their own property. Gaining that freedom, Morrissey said, was worth the move.

That view is becoming outdated, said Ellen Hirsch de Haan, a prominent Largo-based homeowner association lawyer.

People no longer buy a home expecting to stay there for decades, she said.

Not only do people looking for a quick turnover want a guarantee that the neighborhood will look the same in a few years, but de Haan said they also want easy access to amenities, such as pools and parks, that come standard in many large homeowner association communities.

People would lean toward these neighborhoods, de Haan said, even if more choices were available.

"Is it more important to be able to paint the house the colors of your favorite college team, or have a community that is well-maintained?" de Haan asked.

Giving Up Control

When people who want a nice home in a nice neighborhood are forced into association-run communities, they're also forced to take big risks, lawyer Barry Silver said.

Silver represents homeowners in association disputes and said many people don't realize what they're giving up when they move in.

It's about more than losing the ability to choose landscaping or paint colors. In Florida, association rules can override some of the protections of the U.S. Constitution because associations are considered private corporations, not a governmental body.

Silver said that means residents are putting themselves at the mercy of the homeowner association board.

"You have to hope and pray you don't have people who become petty dictators and make your life miserable," he said.

High-profile disputes, such as the battle over a "Support Our Troops" sign in Westchase, or the parents of a cancer patient fighting to keep their son's treehouse in Tampa Palms, highlight the ugly side of life in an association.

Most people, Silver said, assume they'll never end up in that situation, so they don't take time to become fully versed in the consequences of breaking the rules.

That's what happened to Carrollwood Village resident Cherie Callahan. Despite living in the deed-restricted community since the early 1980s, Callahan said she never knew the homeowner association could take her house.

Callahan was diagnosed with Lyme disease in 2002. The illness forced her to stop working, and she fell behind on her bills, including her $284 homeowner association fee.

In September 2003, the association filed a lawsuit to foreclose on her house.

"I just don't understand why a group of private citizens can be afforded that power," she said.

Callahan was lucky. Like most homeowners who face association foreclosure, the board dropped the case after Callahan paid the assessment, plus about $1,000 in attorney and court fees.

In 2004, the Florida Legislature amended association foreclosure laws. Homeowners no longer can face foreclosure for violating deed restrictions and not paying those fines.

They still can face foreclosure, however, for not paying annual dues and special assessment fees.

The costs Callahan faced pale in comparison to the fees some homeowners have paid associations.

What started as a fine for a dried-up lawn has Pebble Creek homeowner Edward Simmons facing more than $50,000 in attorney and court fees after he tried to fight his homeowner associatiom.

A civil court sided with the association, ordering Simmons not only to fix his lawn, but also pay fees the association accrued during the four-year legal battle.

In April, a judge ordered the two parties into mediation, which could help reduce Simmons' fees.

Value Judgments

Extreme cases grab headlines, but studies show that the majority of homeowners are happy living in association-run communities, and think deed restrictions help protect their property value.

Although that's a common belief among homeowner association residents, it is difficult to make a direct connection between deed restrictions and higher property values.

Comparing property values is an imperfect science, said Tim Wilmath, who oversees valuation for the Hillsborough County Property Appraiser's Office.

A 1,300-square-foot home built in the mid-1970s in Bay Crest Park, a deed-restricted community, sold last year for $234,000. A similar size home, built during the same time period, but in an adjacent Town 'N Country neighborhood with no deed restrictions sold for $185,000.

Across the county, in Temple Terrace, the opposite is true. A 3,000-square-foot home, built in the mid-1980s in a deed-restricted community near the Temple Terrace Golf and Country Club, sold for $365,000. Around the corner, on restriction-free Sleepy Hollow Avenue, a comparable house sold for $400,000.

Expect Trend To Continue

Whether there is a financial benefit to buying in a deed-restricted community, growth management officials say its likely new housing developments will continue to have restrictions and homeowner associations.

"They almost have to," said Joe Incorvia, Hillsborough County's community planning manager. "In fact, they're inherently flawed if they do not."

That's because stormwater requirements in the Land Development Codes, as well as the Hillsborough Comprehensive Plan, force developers to add amenities the county wants but won't pay for.

That includes parks, walking trails and stormwater ponds, all of which require maintenance. Steady maintenance requires a steady flow of money, and one of the easiest ways for a developer to get that money is to establish a homeowner association with yearly dues.

Municipalities could add and maintain these amenities on their own, Incorvia said, but it would come at a cost - a higher tax rate.

"There's really not an alternative," he said.

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7401 Patrician Place
Tampa FL 33619 Read More »
 
 

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Hi I am Chris! Founder of Apple Roof Cleaning. I enjoy Cleaning Shingle And Tile Roofs In The Tampa Florida area, and teaching what I know at The Roof Cleaning Institute Of America. Read More..
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